Tranquila y paciente por favor!

While pondering the decision I made to participate in the Nicaragua internship, I kept getting the imagery of making a huge leap into the unknown.  The commitment to be out-of-pocket for 3 weeks from my country of origin was daunting and exciting at the same time.  One of the biggest advantages I had was my innate willingness to accept challenges, be flexible, and my love for people!  Other strengths (e.g., past experiences and practices, art therapy toolkit, concepts, theories, etc.) were perhaps floating somewhere in between my conscious and subconscious; although not too deep.  Though it was hard to not rely on what I thought I knew on the first day I quickly became a sponge as I attempted soak up everything around me.

The first few days of our daily walks to and from our host family we were escorted and they were concerned about us walking alone.  I thought, “Hmm, ok we are strangers in a new country and community…I get it.”  What got me was how each day we left for the day (and sometimes for lunch) we all waited together to lock up and walk down the street together.  The Center coordinator would not allow us to just walk off on our own; it didn’t matter that we would split off from each other after 1 or 2 blocks!  I am used to being independent and to be on my own so this was hard.  One time I forgot about this and said to my partner, “C’mon let’s go; why are you waiting?”  She reminded me that we need to wait together for everyone.

When you are used to having to fend for yourself, figure things out on your own without any help you get used to this “being” even if it is away from ones roots.  I am a helper by nature and the “gifts” I have to share with others naturally come out.  Surrendering my desire/need to “do’ was something I had to get used to quickly in order to be culturally sensitive.  I am not used to being waited on, pampered over, or attended to.  I was acutely aware of offending her and her family and so I soon welcomed the wonderful homemade meals that had been toiled over in the unyielding heat; for me.  I still remember the delight on her face when she saw that we were enjoying ourselves and were content.  My ideas about helping and its’ place in this context continued to be challenged during the times we spent together.  Giving into the cultural norms as well as my curiosity and desire to learn from her is what truly allowed me to become present and to remain there.  The concept of fluidity or “rolling with it” is what can naturally occur when the formal aspect of roles are allowed to evaporate.  Tranquila y paciente por favor! (Part 1)

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Making tortillas from scratch!

Impetus

In considering one’s art practice—the time, energy, struggles, and dedication required—the why one does it begs to be answered.  For me this answer developed over a period of time even though my artistic journey began almost immediately after a personal tragedy; the sudden, unexpected death of my stepfather.  It was then that I discovered that creating art was not simply something to do to pass the time while I grieved but the start of a life-changing passion that I would continue to develop and never stop doing for as long as I live.

My life mantra is to “help others for their betterment.”  It is more than a duty or responsibility; it is a spiritual gift.  I believe that in order to help others it is important to have resources at your disposal.  My resources have taken many forms including the sharing of skills, time, experience, myself, and wholehearted belief in the dignity of those who I have had the privilege to help.  For several years art has been one of my major resources I use in helping others.  As I continue to grow in my art practice I realize that the core motivation for what I do goes beyond the fulfillment of my need; it extends from within my desire to genuinely help others for their benefit and empowerment.

In the midst of violent and often issue-laden situations that are less than what one would consider “community” I have chosen to look beyond the ugly and instead focus on the need to remember the importance of upholding family, togetherness, collaboration, and community.  I do not ignore the reality of what is; instead, I am compelled to address the inequities of neglect, child abuse, violence, and poor influences.

GROUP 2 messages FRONT

My life experiences working with people have taught me a lot.  One of my greatest joys in life has been working with physically and mentally challenged individuals.  I currently work with autistic children and am learning firsthand the value I can help instill in these individuals and their development.  This fall I will start my graduate work in Art Therapy.  I look forward to working as an art therapist where it will afford me the opportunity to use my passion to work with adults and children who suffer from PTSD and other related disorders.  I am interested in working with seniors suffering from mental illness; those who often are disregarded and whose symptoms may be taken as normal signs of aging.

 

Embracing Art’s Healing Power

Life experiences are a mixed bag at best!  As we continue to live each of us will have our share of “life” and there’s no way of getting around it.  I think the reality of having to deal with emotions that arise from these experiences is what is most troubling.

You’ve heard the saying time is a great healer—well the pen and paper, easel, clay, sketchpad, etc., can be too.  This year provided much fodder for creativity as well as any other year that’s come and gone before it.  On both inter- and intrapersonal level I, like you have had my share of the good, the bad, and the ugly.  In addition, the events that have happened around us—the things that come from without and which we have no control over—continue to impact our present and future outlook as we respond to life experiences.  As an optimistic realist I have had both growth and decline in my emotional, social, and spiritual life this year.

Gratefully, we artists have a way to vent and express our joy and sorrows.

One of the ‘without’ experiences that has affected my life forever was the outcome of the Trayvon Martin case.  Looking at it from strictly a human level—

a person’s life was taken

             by another

without vindication…period

From this outcome a sobering reality was once again brought home to bear along with far-reaching historical and present-day ramifications for the Black community.  A deep-seated inconsolable pain emerged which threatened to overtake and turn me toward a dark path.  And since the legal system in our society failed miserably to bring to justice a person responsible for the crime could it be that a person didn’t do it?  If no one did it, then it had to be Skittles.  That’s right Skittles killed Trayvon!  Thus my series “Death by Skittles” was born.

Death by Skittles--confrontation

Death by Skittles–confrontation

Without going through the litany of whys; what could be and what is, I simply know that for me the ability to release my sorrow and pain through the use of media is what is bringing healing from this tragedy.  By God’s grace I’m moving on and in my small way I will continue to address the societal problems and issues; the inequities and poor influences that affect, plague, and short-circuit our children’s paths towards a healthy future.

Death by Skittles--He's Gone

Death by Skittles–He’s Gone

From the time I started, a number of paintings, collages, writings, etc., have emerged.  I have shared a few with you.  And yes, I create art that communicates the good as well as bad.  Today someone needed to know about the ugly.

Death by Skittles-You Feelin the Rainbow?

Death by Skittles-You Feelin the Rainbow?

“The Human Touch” and Willie Birch at Redline Gallery

The “Human Touch” an exhibit focusing on people and diversity recently opened at Redline Gallery in Milwaukee.  The exhibit, which runs from October 18 through December 23, includes over 40 works from a variety of media—ranging from serious to whimsical.  This is definitely my kind of exhibit!  The works exhibited are from the corporate collection of over 400 pieces owned by RBC Wealth Management, one of the nation’s largest full-service securities firm headquartered in Minneapolis.  Redline is definitely privileged to have these works on loan from this 20-year old collection.

As a resource artist at Redline, I was invited to the opening day gallery talk with curator Don McNeill.  Don gave great insight into how the collection begun and has grown over the years.  The exhibition is a traveling one and Don has been curating the show since 2000.  Some of the works included are from artists early in their career before they became well known.  One of the pieces from Kehinde Wiley is of his early work when he used baroque fabric for the background of his urban men—today he paints the backgrounds.  Other artists whose work is included are:  Carrie Mae Weems, Dawoud Bey, Radcliffe Bailey, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claudette Schreuders.

As part of the opening week Redline invited Willie Birch, New Orleans-based artist.  I believe this was Willie’s first time being in Milwaukee as he commented on the coolness of the weather more than once!  I first encountered Willie’s work in person when it was displayed at the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University.  The exhibit was borne to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation.  Willie’s work was very striking and I will never forget the huge canvasses in black and white using primarily acrylic and charcoal.  His matter-of-fact themes are based on the everyday lives of people Willie knows personally, has met on occasion, or happened upon in his daily travels; and the surroundings in which they live.  McNeill mentioned how Willie uses a simple camera to take photographs of his subjects before returning to his studio to paint them.  There is a lot of historical significance to Willie’s work.  He has done paintings of people who were most likely victims of the horrific Katrina that occurred in 2005.  Some of the communities that are part of his work are probably no longer in existence.

During his visit, Redline took Willie on a small tour of Milwaukee.  At the Gallery he performed gallery visits for several of the artist.  I was extremely blessed to not only have a studio visit but to spend an evening at dinner alone with Willie!  Willie is a polite gentleman, a very experienced artist, and a man with no shortage of conversation.  The man will talk you under the table—but is very engaging—you’ll wonder where the time went.  Seriously, if it hadn’t been for Beans and Barley closing on a Wednesday night—we’d probably still be there—him talking and me listening (lol)!

Me and Willie Birch

Me and Willie Birch

I really appreciated his “down home” manner; Willie is a highly successful artist, well represented, collected, and all that but he doesn’t wear it on his sleeve!  He shared his journeys and experiences with different galleries and a new direction he is going in with his work—public art and sculpture.  He recently designed “Crawfish Mounds” a sculpture that captures the essence of the New Orleans culture and its people.  For years Willie has had an interest in the fragility of grass, flowers, and crawfish mounds as he relates their survival to human beings’ struggle to survive.  Anyone that is native of New Orleans readily identifies with crawfish mounds.  Recently Willie had begun converting crawfish mounds into sculptural forms—from paper mâché to large-scale bronze.

As an artist, activist, historian, devoted father, and so much more Willie has already made significant contributions to the art world and beyond.  At 70 years he’s nowhere close to being done.

A Piece for the Tourist by Willie Birch

A Piece for the Tourist – W. Birch

Color Courage

As a visual artist I continue to challenge my courage for color.  I love color, period.  Well, is there such thing as too much color?  Is it ever more appropriate to use color than not?

I truly love to dance with color whereas color field artists conduct an orchestra with it.  Perhaps how color is used is solely dependent on the composition and emphasis of the piece—even though the artist may never voice this.  How many artists exist that do not know what colors they will choose at first—but decide along the way?  Others know from the start that it will be all about color and plan the piece based on the colors they want to use.  One color field artist friend of mine loves ‘playing’ with paint and is always reworking and changing colors.  Still some experiment—the first colors chosen are for swapped out for different ones—adopting a ‘devil-may-care’ attitude (hey, why not you can always gesso over mud).  Based on my current work (Children at Play) which uses color contrasts as part of the composition, I already know what colors I’ll use and how they will work to communicate what I’m trying to say.  The background colors I choose are just as important as the foreground or subjects’ colors. To avoid stagnation I strive to vary the intensity and effect making sure I have a good balance between dark and light tones with other elements of the piece.

The courage for me comes in being true to the piece and not letting my rampant color desires take over and disrupt what I’m trying to get to say to the viewer.  BUT, what about the unquenchable love for color that I told you I have?  Taking a “break” from my primary theme is a must for me.  This has been especially true of my recent Death by Skittles series—it can be too emotionally draining.  So I use printmaking, collage, mixed media, and fiber to get off on color.  Here’s one called Birds in Flight (mixed media) and Musing at Lake Serene (mixed media).

Birds in Flight

Birds in Flight

Musing at lake serene

Musing at Lake Serene

Um yes, it is possible to have color overload in a painting.  Just because you have access to every paint color variation in the rainbow doesn’t mean you have to use them all.  The eye can only take so much.  If many variations can be created from a few colors, why use 25 different ones.  I am sure—less is more.

30 Americans Exhibit Closes

On Saturday, September 7, I spent several hours on what would be my last visit to the 30 Americans exhibit on display at the Milwaukee Art Museum (MAM). While I do not have official numbers of visitors that day, it was wall-to-wall. I personally knew several people who were going this weekend to see it just one last time—the exhibit closed today, September 8. As one of the Wisconsin 30, I have gone often to participate in the related events, listen to speakers, et cetera—but it’s been so much more than this privilege afforded me. Like many others I was drawn back to it over and over again—each time attempting to absorb the magnitude and wealth of knowledge and information it had to offer. It’s hard to believe that it is over.

Even before the thought of the exhibition’s last showing loomed into view I was aware of what would soon take place. The reality slap came when I received the email from MAM staff giving instructions for the retrieval of my artwork. Many emotions have begun to manifest and I find myself asking, “Is this exhibit the beginning of many things to come (meaning, will similar provocative work find its way to MAM’s doors)? “Was this just another ‘one-of-a-kind’ event that comes once in your lifetime similar to Halley’s Comet?” “Will the timeless historical, cultural, societal, and political relevancy of this exhibit continue to reverberate throughout the hearts, minds, and souls of those who experienced it first-hand?” “Will it just remain ‘colorful eye candy’ to the shallow and simple-minded who wonder how did they (a particular ’30 American’ artist they admired) make it (the piece they were particularly drawn to)? “Is the significance and timing of 30 Americans coming to Milwaukee meant to be esoteric?” “What effect will it have on me and my work?” “What will the youth that visited the exhibit learn from it?”

As I ponder possible answers to these questions my belief that whether you have taken a panoramic or microscopic view of 30 Americans you will admit you are not the same you were before attending. Will you allow that changed person to move you to do something more—to be something more?

Most artists attempt to communicate to the viewer in their work—that’s what we do. It might sound crude, but whether you get it doesn’t really matter—we still has to get it out. The 30 Americans artists were not just speaking loudly—they were shouting!! Did you get it?

The Rubells–Owners of the “30 Americans”

Mera and Don Rubell

Mera and Don Rubell

On Thursday, August 15, Don and Mera Rubell, the owners of the 30 Americans exhibit visited the Milwaukee Art Museum (MAM).  The Rubell Family Collection (RFC), which includes the 30 Americans, comprises thousands of works and is probably one of the largest privately-owned art collections in the world.  Juan Roselione-Valadez, the director of the RFC facilitated the down-to-earth, impromptu lecture.  The Lubar Auditorium was near capacity as the Rubells shared the beginnings of their journey which began shortly after their marriage in 1964.

Mera, the primary spokesperson, shared how making a “connection” with the artists, their work, and inspiration is just as important (if not more) as purchasing art.  The Rubells shared stories of the intimate relationships they fostered with well-known artists Jean Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Jeff Koons, and others.  Surprisingly, conversations they had with contemporary artists (many of whom happened to be African American) and their influences revealed artists whose works they had been acquiring for the past 30 years—Robert Colescott, Carrie Mae Weems, Barkley Hendricks, and Kara Walker—to name a few.  The idea of 30 Americans exhibit was born from a desire to marry the works of both emerging artists and those who inspired them.  Again, they happened to be African American artists.

I enjoyed the Rubells’ candor and humor as they shared the pact they made early on to discuss the “validity of collecting potential artworks” with each other before purchasing them.  Both state they have held true to this collaborative spirit—not always easy when one’s passion over acquiring a new work overrules the logic of such a purchase!  The talk was informative, entertaining, and authentic—I could have listened to them for hours.