Embracing Art’s Healing Power

Life experiences are a mixed bag at best!  As we continue to live each of us will have our share of “life” and there’s no way of getting around it.  I think the reality of having to deal with emotions that arise from these experiences is what is most troubling.

You’ve heard the saying time is a great healer—well the pen and paper, easel, clay, sketchpad, etc., can be too.  This year provided much fodder for creativity as well as any other year that’s come and gone before it.  On both inter- and intrapersonal level I, like you have had my share of the good, the bad, and the ugly.  In addition, the events that have happened around us—the things that come from without and which we have no control over—continue to impact our present and future outlook as we respond to life experiences.  As an optimistic realist I have had both growth and decline in my emotional, social, and spiritual life this year.

Gratefully, we artists have a way to vent and express our joy and sorrows.

One of the ‘without’ experiences that has affected my life forever was the outcome of the Trayvon Martin case.  Looking at it from strictly a human level—

a person’s life was taken

             by another

without vindication…period

From this outcome a sobering reality was once again brought home to bear along with far-reaching historical and present-day ramifications for the Black community.  A deep-seated inconsolable pain emerged which threatened to overtake and turn me toward a dark path.  And since the legal system in our society failed miserably to bring to justice a person responsible for the crime could it be that a person didn’t do it?  If no one did it, then it had to be Skittles.  That’s right Skittles killed Trayvon!  Thus my series “Death by Skittles” was born.

Death by Skittles--confrontation

Death by Skittles–confrontation

Without going through the litany of whys; what could be and what is, I simply know that for me the ability to release my sorrow and pain through the use of media is what is bringing healing from this tragedy.  By God’s grace I’m moving on and in my small way I will continue to address the societal problems and issues; the inequities and poor influences that affect, plague, and short-circuit our children’s paths towards a healthy future.

Death by Skittles--He's Gone

Death by Skittles–He’s Gone

From the time I started, a number of paintings, collages, writings, etc., have emerged.  I have shared a few with you.  And yes, I create art that communicates the good as well as bad.  Today someone needed to know about the ugly.

Death by Skittles-You Feelin the Rainbow?

Death by Skittles-You Feelin the Rainbow?

The Rubells–Owners of the “30 Americans”

Mera and Don Rubell

Mera and Don Rubell

On Thursday, August 15, Don and Mera Rubell, the owners of the 30 Americans exhibit visited the Milwaukee Art Museum (MAM).  The Rubell Family Collection (RFC), which includes the 30 Americans, comprises thousands of works and is probably one of the largest privately-owned art collections in the world.  Juan Roselione-Valadez, the director of the RFC facilitated the down-to-earth, impromptu lecture.  The Lubar Auditorium was near capacity as the Rubells shared the beginnings of their journey which began shortly after their marriage in 1964.

Mera, the primary spokesperson, shared how making a “connection” with the artists, their work, and inspiration is just as important (if not more) as purchasing art.  The Rubells shared stories of the intimate relationships they fostered with well-known artists Jean Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Jeff Koons, and others.  Surprisingly, conversations they had with contemporary artists (many of whom happened to be African American) and their influences revealed artists whose works they had been acquiring for the past 30 years—Robert Colescott, Carrie Mae Weems, Barkley Hendricks, and Kara Walker—to name a few.  The idea of 30 Americans exhibit was born from a desire to marry the works of both emerging artists and those who inspired them.  Again, they happened to be African American artists.

I enjoyed the Rubells’ candor and humor as they shared the pact they made early on to discuss the “validity of collecting potential artworks” with each other before purchasing them.  Both state they have held true to this collaborative spirit—not always easy when one’s passion over acquiring a new work overrules the logic of such a purchase!  The talk was informative, entertaining, and authentic—I could have listened to them for hours.